Pop Culture | Movies | 70s

If It Weren't For The Beatles, 'Monty Python's Life of Brian' Would Have Never Happened

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Monty Python's Life of Brian is one of the biggest comedy movies of the 1970s, and it's stood the test of time. Beloved by audiences worldwide, you pretty much can't sing the words "Always look on the bright side of life" without someone chiming in with the signature whistle from the end of the film.

After tackling Arthurian Myth with Monty Python and the Holy Grail four years prior, the kings of British comedy decided to tackle the story of Christ in their signature brand of absurd humor. It was the perfect match for their style, and the results continue to speak for themselves.

However, the movie had no shortage of issues getting made, with the biggest one coming right before the Pythons even began filming!

HandMade Films

You see, the movie was being produced and financed by EMI Films, but when studio executives sat down and read the script, they pulled out of their involvement from it due to finding the story "blasphemous." Problem was, this happened a week before filming was to start, meaning the Pythons were ready to go, but suddenly had no money!

HandMade Films

The group needed help, and it turned out they had a massive fan who was more than willing to help them out. A fan who just so happened to be a former member of the biggest rock band of all time.

I'm referring, of course, to George Harrison of The Beatles.

E!

Seriously, if it wasn't for George Harrison, we wouldn't have Life of Brian.

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