80s | Pop Culture | TV

10 Facts About 'Night Court' Even Bull Didn't Know

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From 1984 to 1992, Night Court was one of the most beloved comedies on TV. Part of NBC's "Must See Thursday" lineup alongside shows like Family Ties and Cheers, the show won a number of Emmys, and ran for a whopping NINE seasons (that's 193 episodes people).

Focusing on a newly-appointed judge who was literally the last possible choice for the job and the cast of misfits that work with him, the show had us splitting our sides with laughter. We still love it today, but did you know these 10 facts about it?

John Larroquette was just too good at his job.

NBC

After winning an Emmy for Best Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series four years in a row, he asked for his name to be taken out of the running. He was also offered a spinoff series based on his Dan Fielding character, but turned it down.

A quick reference to a singer led to a surprise cameo.

Harry Stone is mentioned as being a massive fan of jazz/pop singer Mel Tormé in the shows first episode. Friends and family of Tormé called him to let him know, and he was so touched by the reference he agreed to a cameo. He also said the references boosted his audiences and rekindled his singing career.

There were a massive number of recasts in the first season.

NBC

In the first year of the show, six female leads were featured before the studio settled on Markie Post. The only cast members to remain from the pilot until the finale were Harry Anderson, John Larroquette, and Richard Moll.

The cast had to clear out pretty quickly at the end.

NBC

After taping the show's final episode on a Friday, the cast and crew were sent telegrams to have their dressing rooms vacated by the following Monday, or their belongings would be thrown away. Yeesh.

You think those facts are crazy? You haven't seen anything yet!

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